SIDS (Sudden Infant Death Syndrome) and SUDI (Sudden Unexpected Death in Infancy) topics covered by Red Nose are exceptionally valuable information. Since Reducing the Risks of SIDS public health campaign started in 1991 there has been a phenomenal 80% decrease in SIDS incidents. This is a confronting topic that is hard to discuss openly for many of us and whilst these issues are frightening it is important we empower ourselves with the knowledge that is scientifically proven to prevent help prevent a terrible tragedy. The harsh truth is that these things can happen to anyone and we would like to offer our love and support to any family who has been affected by this most devastating of tragedies. All those gentle angels are safely tucked into our hearts loved forever. 

Guiding light Red Nose Grief and loss

Red Nose has some truly wonderful people and many forms of support. Visit the Guiding light Red Nose Grief and Loss page where one form of support offered is a 24 hours a day talk in person phone line 1300 308 307. Visit rednosegriefandloss.com.au. Red Nose programs provide health care professionals, carers and GPs with a range of resources for their practice or child care centre on safe sleeping in a care environment, plus accredited online training, and grief and loss information and a referral service.

Safe Sleeping workshop at Kids College on Monday 25 March

RED NOSE offer safe sleep workshops like we hosted at Kids College this last Monday. Thank you so much for your time Andrew. We appreciate your guidance. We updated our SIDS training last year and discovered that red nose have rolled out a new course SUDI. So we booked a course and invited anyone that would like to join us. We learnt some very valuable information and I thought we might share some of the lessons we learnt.

Safe sleeping

  • Sleep baby on back
  • Keep head and face uncovered
  • Keep baby smoke free before and after birth
  • Safe sleeping environment night and day
  • No soft surfaces ore bulky bedding
  • Sleep baby in safe cot in parents’ room
  • Breastfeed baby

Making up baby’s cot guidance
• Use a safe cot that meets the current Australian Standard AS2172
• Use safe mattress: firm, (not tilted or elevated), right size for the cot
• Sleep baby on back
• Keep head and face uncovered
• Position baby’s feet at the bottom of the cot
• Tuck blankets in firmly or use a safe baby sleeping bag

Cot to bed safety guidance
Sleep young children safely
• Safe bed
• Safe mattress
• Safe bedding
• Safe sleeping environment night and day



Alert!
• Bean bags, sofas, large cushions and air mattresses are not safe places for young children to sleep.
• Bunk beds are not recommended for children under nine years of age.
• If a child is wearing a baby sleeping bag whilst sleeping outside of a cot be careful! A child wearing a baby sleeping bag and not confined to a cot is at a higher risk of falling and being injured. The child must be actively supervised and the sleeping bag removed as soon as the child wakes.



Safe wrapping guidance

• Wrapping is a useful method to help babies settle and sleep on their back. Scientific studies have shown that wrapping can have a calming, sleep-promoting effect on young babies. 

• Studies have shown that wrapping can promote more sustained sleep and reduce the frequency of spontaneous awakenings. 

• An alternative to wrapping is to use a safe infant sleeping bag. 


Alert!
Tummy sleeping increases the risk of sudden and unexpected death in infancy (SUDI) and must be avoided. Placing a wrapped baby on their tummy to sleep is especially dangerous as it prevents them moving to a safe position. If you wrap your baby, consider baby’s stage of development. Leave arms free once the startle reflex disappears around 3 months. Most babies eventually resist being wrapped. Wrapping style should be appropriate for the baby’s developmental stage. It is essential to discontinue wrapping as soon as baby starts showing signs that they can begin to roll, usually between 4-6 months. The wrap may prevent an older baby who has turned onto their tummy during sleep from returning to the back sleeping position.



Tummy time advice

Tummy time is good for me because… 
• my neck, shoulder, arm and back muscles will get stronger. I use these muscles to move around 

• I can see the world from different angles, which helps my brain to develop 

• it also prevents me from developing a flat spot on the head 


As soon as I am born… 

• start supervised tummy playtime when I am awake and not too tired 

• put me to sleep on my back (supine) 

• offer supervised tummy play when I am awake at least 
3 times a day 

At the beginning I may be… • unsettled 

• just able to stay on my tummy for a minute or two during playtime 


Remember
Back to sleep
Tummy to play 
Sit up and watch the world

Safe Sleeping Workshops

Red Nose Safe Sleeping Workshops are a must for all parents, carers and grandparents. Red Nose workshops provide participants with practical advice on the safest ways to sleep baby safely to reduce the risk of SIDS and fatal sleeping accidents, following Red Nose’s evidence-based safe sleeping recommendations.
Run by qualified educators, the workshops cover a range of topics drawn from Red Nose’s Safe Sleeping Education Program, which is based on strong scientific evidence and has been developed in consultation with major health authorities and paediatric experts in Australia and overseas.

Red Nose offers courses for parents and carers online.
A free short online course designed to give parents and carers evidence-based information on supporting baby’s temperature regulation.

This free course gives parents and carers the best evidence-based advice available in a clear and easy-to-understand format.
The course covers a range of topics, including:
• Temperature control
• Uncovered sleeping
• Blanket safety
• Removing coverings
• When to seek medical attention
For inquiries about Red Nose eLearning, email elearning@rednose.com.au

Red Nose Services

To access Red Nose Education Services contact 
T1300 998 698, 
E education@rednose.com.au
W rednoseday.com.au
https://rednose.com.au

Red Nose Day this year is on the 9 August 2019

Last year, our fabulous supporters helped raise nearly $1 million for Red Nose Day. This support helps to provide safe sleeping education, research and bereavement support services for families impacted by the death of a child.

Why is it called Red Nose day?

The most prominent symbol of Comic Relief is a plastic/foam “red nose“, which is given in various supermarkets and charity shops such as Oxfam in exchange for a donation to the charity and to make others laugh. People are encouraged to wear the noses on Red Nose Day to help raise awareness of the charity

Kids College Philosophy

‘We have stringent hygiene, health, nutrition, maintenance, safety and protection standards. We take our duty of care very seriously and will safeguard the safety and wellbeing of our children at all times as a matter of utmost priority.’

National Quality Standards

2.1.1Each child’s wellbeing and comfort is provided for, including appropriate opportunities to meet each child’s need for sleep, rest and relaxation. 

2.2.1    At all times, reasonable precautions and adequate supervision ensure children are protected from harm and hazard. 

Kids College family

At Kids College we work each day embedding our values and philosophy into each facet of what we do. We continually improve our practices by critically reflecting and engaging in meaningful relationships with our community and for this we need your support and input. Please let us know if you have any comments, queries or recommendations.

Make sure to follow Kids College Childcare on facebook, watch for our regular emails and keep an eye on our Kids College website. Join our Kids College family community and share in our vision of creating the very best childcare where children experience love, laughter and learning every day. You can reach us on Jennifer@kidscollege.com.au